January 12, 2007

Vedic practices also had a powerful presence of the Tantrik principle in it

Vladimir Wed 10 Jan 2007 03:22 AM PST I think it is very important topic, which sheds some light on the nature of evolutionary process. In 1925-26, when Pavitra was guided into meditation by Sri Aurobindo, practicing the separation of Purusha from Prakriti, aspiring for his personal liberation, Mukti, he got the descent of the Divine Power from above, and all his meditation changed and got centered on it: to become more receptive and open to it. In this process he asked Sri Aurobindo about the completion of what he started to do: the separation of Purusha from Prakriti and his final liberation, and Sri Aurobindo answered that it was surely going to happen, but was not important anymore, for the Shakti was already working in his adhara and she knew better what to do and how to do it.
This Shakti is of the nature of Ishvara-Shakti, where the separation on Purusha and Prakriti is no more an issue. In fact the whole Vedic tradition is based on this Ishvara-koti power, where the realization of the Self was seen in the context of manifestation and not as separation from it. The idea of liberation, Mukti, as we know it now, is a later idea. In my view it can not be sanctioned by the Divine Shakti, therefore we have only few liberated souls, and mainly Avatars and Vibhutis, who had something else to accomplish in the world.
The process of liberation offered by the Vedas and early Upanishads was having a character of transformation: turning our senses within in search of their higher universal domains, devatas, and then making them passive, as it were, or rather attentive to the Presence of the Spirit beyond, which was gradually to take over the whole substance of the sense and thus to come to the surface of consciousness, Manifestation. There was neither separation nor liberation offered but Immortality.
RY Deshpande Wed 10 Jan 2007 04:09 PM PST This is absolutely beautiful, Vlad. “This Shakti is of the nature of Ishvara-Shakti, where the separation on Purusha and Prakriti is no more an issue. In fact the whole Vedic tradition is based on this Ishvara-koti power, where the realization of the Self was seen in the context of manifestation and not as separation from it. The idea of liberation, Mukti, as we know it now, is a later idea.
In my view it can not be sanctioned by the Divine Shakti, therefore we have only few liberated souls, and mainly Avatars and Vibhutis, who had something else to accomplish in the world.” If the Ishwara-Shakti is the Vedic aspect of spirituality, then one could almost say that the Vedic practices also had a powerful presence of the Tantrik principle in it.
Is it true? We don’t see that Shakti aspect in the Upanishads and not explicitly so in the Gita also, which is what makes it an Upanishad, the Upanishad of the Bhagavatgita. When and how started the separation of the Ishwara and the Shakti leading to two independent approaches? Was that inevitable in the Vedic system if it saw Ishwara-Shakti as a single biune reality? We will be thankful to have your views about this important theme. RYD

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