January 05, 2013

Sri Aurobindo imposing mystical constructs

CWSA 36 Autobiographical Notes 13 Family Letters, 1890 1919 Extract from a Letter to His Brother. 1899 ­ 1900.
Only a short while ago I had a letter from you — I cannot lay my hands on the passage, but I remember it contained an unreserved condemnation of Hindu legend as trivial and insipid, a mass of crude and monstrous conceptions, a [lumber-room]1 of Hindu banalities. The main point of your indictment was that it had nothing in it simple, natural, passionate and human, that the characters were lifeless patterns of moral excellence. I have been so long accustomed to regard your taste and judgment as sure and final that it is with some distrust I find myself differing from you…
Will you accept this poem as part-payment of a deep intellectual debt I have been long owing to you? Unknown to yourself, you taught and encouraged me from my childhood to be a poet. From your sun my farthing rush-light was kindled, and it was in your path that I long strove to guide my uncertain and faltering footsteps. If I have now in the inevitable development of an independent temperament in independent surroundings departed from your guidance and entered into a path, perhaps thornier and more rugged, but my own, it does not lessen the obligation of that first light and example. It is my hope that in the enduring fame which your calmer and more luminous genius must one day bring you, on a distant verge of the skies and lower plane of planetary existence, some ray of my name may survive and it be thought no injury to your memory that the first considerable effort of my powers was dedicated to you. Page – 137-8
41 Note On The Texts Sri Aurobindo made a typed copy of these pages from a letter written to his second brother Manmohan (1869 ­ 1924). His intention was to use them as an introduction to his poem Love and Death, written in 1899. At the top of the transcript he typed "To my Brother". This apparently was meant to be the dedication of the poem and not the salutation of the letter. When he was preparing Love and Death for publication in 1920, he dropped both the dedication and the introduction. Page – 570-1

Greek and Interbehavioral Psychology: Selected and Revised Papers ... - Page 74 - Noel W. Smith - 1993 - Preview - More editions In other words, Renou holds that it is not he who is imposing literalism but rather Aurobindo who is imposing mystical constructs. The pitfalls of allegorical interpretations may be seen by comparing those of different writers and noting the ...
The Strides of Vishnu: Hindu Culture in Historical Perspective - Page 11 - Ariel Glucklich - 2008 - Preview - More editions Mythical interpretation is a politically saturated activity, and chapter 9 points out some of its pitfalls but highlights the ... to British colonialism in modern India, focusing on Rammohun Roy, Mohandas K. Gandhi, and Sri Aurobindo Ghosh.
Emotions in Asian Thought: A Dialogue in Comparative Philosophy - Page 101 - Joel MarksRoger T. Ames, Robert C. Solomon - 1995 - Preview - More editions So he invents a new, metaphorical language that has its own pitfalls but that nevertheless takes seriously the dimension of transcendence in a way that ... A contemporary of Tillich's in this tradition, Sri Aurobindo, proposed a philosophy ...
Penguin Sri Aurobindo Reader - Page xxix - ParanjapeMakarand - Preview By separating what is still relevant from what was specific to a particular time and age we can avoid the pitfalls of disillusionment or self-deception. Such indeed was the approach that Sri Aurobindo himself recommended to a classic text like the Gita. A full resolution of the paradox, ...
Hindutva: Exploring the Idea of Hindu Nationalism - Page 56 - Jyotirmaya Sharma - 2011 - Preview - More editions In proposing the revival of kshatriyahood among all Indians, at least in spirit, Aurobindo was acutely aware of the pitfalls. He realized that once the Kshatriya fulfilled his limited role, the survival of the ideal would amount to 'an unrelieved ...
Religion and Public Culture: Encounters and Identities in Modern ... - Page 145 - John Jeya PaulKeith Edward Yandell - 2000 - Preview Aurobindo and the Mother both believed that all institutions should be no more though they will aspire to egoistic permanence. ... How to avoid the usual pitfalls of a collective body, described by Sri Aurobindo as "its characteristic attempts to ...
Sri Aurobindo and the new age: essays in memory of Kishor Gandhi - Page 17 - Sachidananda Mohanty, Nirodbaran, Maurice Shukla - 1997 - While there is the powerful idealistic tradition of Plato onwards, Sri Aurobindo's line of enquiry and conclusions seem far too radical and iconoclastic for the conventional mind to accept. At the same time, there are always problems in the ...
Issues of Identity in Indian English Fiction: A Close Reading of ... - Page 59 - H. S. Komalesha - 2008 - Preview The arguments of Aurobindo and Tagore stand in stark contrast to each other and they might appear extremist stands. ... life and the positive forces of religion, on the other hand, he is equally aware of the pitfalls of both nation and religion.
Philosophy and religion: essays in interpretation - Page 174 - Jarava Lal Mehta - 2004 - Snippet view - More editions A reader of Aurobindo in the last quarter of this century may find some of his phraseology and conceptualization ... Renou himself acknowledges that 'the Sruti is essentially symbolic, basing itself on an indirect and 'second semantic', thus ...
J.L. Mehta on Heidegger, Hermeneutics, and Indian Tradition - Page 165 - Jarava Lal MehtaWilliam Joseph Jackson - 1992 - Preview Even so, Louis Renou and others have only conceded the point, if at all, ... Aurobindo is, of course, nowhere mentioned in Luders' outstanding two-volume work of Vedic research published in 1951 and 1959 respectively, not even in the ...
Hymns of the Rig Veda - Page xxvi - 2004 - Preview - More editions In this translation I have availed myself of the work of previous scholars, students, and masters in the field, particularly McDonnell, Griffith, Renou, Agrawala, Gonda, Coomaraswamy, and Aurobindo. The method I have followed is simple: every ...
Sri Aurobindo's treatment of Hindu myth - Page 42 - Jan Feys - 1983 - A Vedic scholar of the magnitude of L. Renou recently expressed his doubts as to the plausibility of Aurobindo's thesis113 The concluding chapter of The Secret sums up Aurobindo's findings after two years of research into the symbolism of the...
Gosvāmī Tulasīdāsakr̥ta Śrīrāmacaritamānasa: Shriramacharitamanasa - Page 859 - Tulasīdāsa, Rāmacandra Prasāda - 1989 - Preview - More editions Sri Aurobindo has called the Ramacharitamanasa a combination of 'lyric intensity' and 'the sublimity of the epic imagination' and Louis Renou calls it 'a lyrical epic'. The lyricism of the work is in this personal realization of a faith which the poet ...

Barindra Kumar Ghosh - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia or, popularly, Barin Ghosh (5 January 1880 – 18 April 1959) was an Indian revolutionary and journalist. The Tale of My Exile - Barindra Kumar Ghosh - 2010 - No preview - More editions This is a reproduction of a book published before 1923. History - Page 179 - Raghunath Rai - Preview The extremist leaders Aurobindo Ghosh and Bipin Chandra Pal followed the method of constitutionalism. But the revolutionaries under the leadership of Barindra Kumar Ghosh and Bhupindranath Dutt started terrorist activities.

In the May 1996 issue of Lingua Franca, in the article "A Physicist Experiments With Cultural Studies", Sokal revealed that his "Transgressing the Boundaries" was a hoax and concluded that Social Text "felt comfortable publishing an article on quantum physics without bothering to consult anyone knowledgeable in the subject" because of its ideological proclivities and editorial bias.

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